September 22, 2020

 

As a parent, toilet training has come across my mind now that my once-baby is now a toddler. Of course, there will be a time where I will be weaning him from the diapers later on, and I was looking for some ideas on toilet training for toddlers.

Toilet Training Oopsie Heroes

Bedwetting at age 9 or understanding how to toilet train a child at night is one of the most common challenges for parents. Bedwetting can often disrupt sleep, and when the mattress is wet, that’s a whole new kind of work as well!

Thus, as a parent, you want to make the toilet training and bedwetting issues to come through as a breeze. In this post, you will discover some tips that will help you succeed in toilet training for toddlers or bedwetting problems for older children.

Toilet training for toddlers and bedwetting problems for older children: Tips and advice

Use a tangible system

When understanding how to toilet train a child at night, the brain must associate the cues of having to go to pee just before it happens. A bedwetting alarm helps because it strengthens the association using a beeping sound. Oopsie Heroes is one of the best bedwetting alarm systems you can try because it is discrete and sensitive to urine. Take a look at how it works below:

Potty Training App Oopsie Heroes

To put simply, you just stick the device on your child’s underwear and it will pick up signs of moisture before full-on bedwetting starts.

Oopsie Heroes PLUS

The great thing about using a tangible system, such as an alarm, is that it also alerts you as a parent. When you rely on your child to tell you that he or she has to go, the training can turn inconsistent. Having a beeping sound to alert you every time makes the association more consistent.

Incorporate fun characters

Bedwetting can also be caused by anxiety issues or changes in development. Thus, it is ideal to paint the experience in a positive light, rather than something that gives them feelings of anxiousness.

One of the ways to do this is to incorporate fun characters. Oopsie Heroes is also integrated with a fun-looking app where children can pick their “heroes” who will alarm them if they have an “oopsie” moment. This is such a great idea because it diverts their attention from feeling anxious but rather giving them a fun challenge to respond to the hero’s call.

Oopsie Heroes App

The idea is also the same in toilet training for toddlers. If you’re trying to wean from diapers, you can use the alarm system during the day and bring your phone along with you. You can show your child that the hero is now telling them to go to the potty just before they pee completely.

Have learning materials

Aside from using devices, you can try reading books, watching shows, playing toys, or telling stories where characters go to the toilet when they feeling like peeing or pooing. This is one way of strengthening the association between having urges and going to the bathroom when needed.

Make sure to use age-appropriate learning materials, and discuss terms that are easily understood by your child. Let them know that having an “oopsie” moment is okay, as long as they try again and do better next time.

Avoid scolding your child

As mentioned earlier, you don’t want to add to your child’s anxiety about bedwetting because it doesn’t help them succeed easily. Scolding them about wetting the bed or their underwear will just give them less confidence in overcoming toilet training or bedwetting issues.

Oopsie Heroes

As the principle of Oopsie Heroes, use a positive, encouraging, and fun mindset when training your child to pee properly at night or even during the day. This helps builds confidence, trust, and the ability to recognize that mistakes aren’t the end-all-be-all of any predicament.

That’s it! I hope you found these toilet training for toddlers and bedwetting issues strategies useful. Don’t forget to check out Oopsie Heroes on their website to find out more.

This post is sponsored by Oopsie Heroes, a bedwetting and toilet training alarm system company. Oopsie Heroes is a smart device that senses moisture at the beginning of bedwetting or urination during the day, allowing an auditory prompt (beeping sound) to alert the child. You can learn more about Oopsie Heroes on their website.

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